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June 21 2017

The Mummy looks set to lose money

Folks, everyone saw this coming. Why did you bother making it?

It seems that The Mummy budget was closer to $195M than the widely reported $125M. Throw in a whopping $150M in distribution and advertising and Universal is into this film for $345M. Now, the film looks set to close out its theatrical run around $375M which you would think would mean a profit of $30M, but nope, you would be wrong.

The majority of this revenue is coming from the foreign markets where you have countries like China – currently 34 percent of the total box office –  that keep up to 75 percent of the ticket price for the government. When all is said and done, Deadline is reporting that The Mummy is going to lose around $95M. For it to have any hope of even breaking even it would have to gross $450M and that just isn’t going to happen.

Welcome to Hollywood math, folks.

The thing is, everyone seems delusional on this one. Speaking to Business Insider, director Alex Kurtzman said of all the negative reviews:

This is a movie that I think is made for audiences and in my experience, critics and audiences don’t always sing the same song. I’m not making movies. Would I love them to love it? Of course, everybody would, but that’s not really the endgame. We made a film for audiences and not critics so my great hope is they will find it and they will appreciate it.

Well, the problem is the audience isn’t enjoying it either and it is currently 43 percent for the audience on Rotten Tomatoes.

Universal was trying the ham-fisted approach to setting up a cinematic universe, and it’s not working. I would say bury this with a real mummy and just move on.


Source: Deadline .


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  • Ponta Vedra

    Nah, they made money. A substantial chunk of the budget went to paying the studio itself for use of its resources. Not counted in the revenue are the after-sales, the online streaming and other broadcast income. It won’t make as much money as a real hit, but they’re not going away poorer.